Brexit doctors and nurses

Update (12/04/2019)

The EU and UK have agreed a further delay to Brexit until 31 October, the below information will be subject to change. As soon as further news is announced we’ll keep you updated.


There’s so much uncertainty surrounding Brexit and it seems that each day brings new developments and changes. Especially with an extension on the horizon.

So, what can we be certain of? We’ve ground together the latest information to help with you understand how this affects you if you’re based in the EU, EEA or Switzerland, or if you’re based in the UK but originally from the EU, EEA or Switzerland.

What happens if a Brexit deal is agreed?

If there’s a deal, citizens of the EU, EEA or Switzerland must apply for settled or pre-settled status. If you’ve applied for this prior to 30th March the fee of £65 will be refunded. All applications after for 30th of March will be free.

If the UK leaves the EU with a deal the deadline for applying will be 30th June 2021. However, if a Brexit deal is not secured, you will need to be living in the UK by 29th March 2019 and the deadline for applying will be 31st December 2020.

If you come to the UK for the first time after 12th April 2019 you’ll be able to stay for three months. To continue living in the UK you’ll need to apply to a new scheme – details will be announced if the UK leaves the EU without a deal.

You can apply to the scheme now if you’re:
•             An EU citizen and have a passport with a biometric chip.
•             A family member of an EU citizen and have a residence card with a biometric chip.
•             Have or can borrow an Android phone – you’ll need this to complete the application as the app works only on Android currently.

Don’t worry if you don’t have the above, there will be more ways to apply after 29th March 2019.

If you’re from Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway or Switzerland, you can also apply after 29th March 2019.

Will I get settled or pre-settled status?

You won’t get to choose whether you get settled or pre-settled status as this is determined on how long you have lived in the UK when you apply.

What about my family?

Post-Brexit, EU nationals who wish to join family members “will need permission to do so, normally in the form of an electronic status, which must be obtained before coming to the UK.” In the current Brexit deal, family members will continue to have the right to come to the UK.

What happens if the UK leaves the EU without a deal?

If we leave the EU with no deal, experts have speculated that EU citizens can remain for three years and will then need to qualify for a visa to stay within the UK. The requirements of this visa are not clear at this stage.

Your family member can still come to live with you in the UK. They’ll need to prove their relationship with you existed before 12th April 2019.

If they’re a citizen of a country outside the EU, EEA or Switzerland they’ll need to have an ‘EEA family permit’ to enter the UK. It’ll be valid for 6 months – they can then apply to the EU Settlement Scheme.

Applying for British citizenship

You might be able to apply for British citizenship if you’ve:

  • Have a permanent residence document or ‘indefinite leave to remain’ – this means you can stay in the UK for as long as you want.
  • Lived in the UK for six years – if you’re married to a British citizen, this time limit may be reduced.

You won’t need to apply for settled status if you get British citizenship.

If a child has been born in the UK, they may already be classed as a British citizen or be eligible to apply for citizenship. You’ll need to pay a fee to apply.

In the case of a no deal Brexit, you can be a citizen of Britain and a citizen of another country at the same time – but only if the other country permits it. You’ll need to contact the country’s consulate, embassy or high commission in the UK to check.

If you have any questions or want to discuss what this means for you, please contact our international team at info@athona.com.

All information stated above has been sourced from gov.uk and is correct as of 28/03/2019.